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and recent cnn/rnc polling shows more than 2 in 3 support tax hikes for the wealthy. u.s. a reality that republicans will grapple with from now until new year's day. joining me, congressman tom cole from oklahoma. a republican. thank you for joining us. >> thank you. >> your proposal, republican lawmakers should agree with democrats, exstand the tax breaks for those making $250,000 or less, before the end fortunate year, deal with the tax rates for the wealthiest later. an idea that a lot of republicans are resisting. what kind of pushback are you getting? >> the reaction is mixed. some support it. some don't. some have more questions about it. but, look, the issue really is pretty simple. i don't believe in raising tax rates on anybody. i think it's bad for the economy. bad for job creations. ultimately by slowing down growth cuts revenue, and the president needs to come to the table with real spending restraint and real, frankly, entitlement reform. having said that, if we agree taxes shouldn't go up on 98% of the people, shouldn't we take that now and get that set aside, make sur
the terrorist attack in the u.s. consulate in bengahzi. you were westerning that al qaeda was gaining a foothold in libya. what do you think as to why those references were deleted. >> it's off times, wolf, these talking points went to multiple agcies, probably a dozen agencies, and dozens of people touched them. nobody ever took final responsibility for the clearing of them. it's sort of a typical bureaucratic fumble as far as i'm concerned. and the more frustrating thing to me, wolf, is the fact of what we're not talking about, while we continue to talk about the talking points, what is lost in this is as you say, prior to this event, al qaeda was gaining a foothold in libya, and why wasn't more security given to them at the u.s. consulate. the substance of this is lost in the debate about the talking points and that is the more important issue to me. guys, thank you very much for joining us. >> thanks. >> pleasure. >> rebel fighters in syria are claiming a major victory. they say they shot down three regime aircraft in the past 24 hours, including a mig fighter jet. if true, the regime may be
for themselves. but isn't there a danger in having a political appointee like a u.s. ambassador, in a sense, freelancing, when critical material is concerned. >> i don't think so, i think ambassador rice could have easily said we may have had an organized terrorist group that may have had affiliated with al-qaeda behind the attack in benghazi. i don't think it would have been compromising any sensitive information. i think the administration has used that as an excuse, and it really -- you know, america has a lot of overclassifying, that is one reason there are adults that are supposed to be able to handle this. and i don't think it would have been that difficult for her to somewhat give a more nuance discussion of what really transpired in benghazi. >> fran, you dealt with classified and unclassified talking points when you served at the white house, do you agree with rueul? >> well, those that drafted these talking points, perhaps the intelligence community will prepare the individual going out on the sunday show, especially if they're doing multiple shows, to understand where the lines h
that remark. 73 minutes later took to the floor of the u.s. senate to respond. >> mr. president, four brave americans died. it has now been eight weeks and the american people have received nothing but contradictory statements from all levels of our government. this president and this administration has either been guilty of colossal incompetence, or engaged in a cover-up, neither of which are acceptable to the american people. >> keeping then honest, more than two months after the deadly attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, there are still some serious questions about the timeline of the events and specifically the administration's response in the days and weeks that followed. specifically, why didn't the president call it an act of terrorism? the president said, "it was quote too early to know exactly how this came about. or during an appearance on "the view" on the 25th. when asked, the president said "they were doing an investigation." or even more to the point, how the president described it five days after the attacks. >> putting together the best information that we have availab
about the merits of the case. the u.s. department of justice doesn't have the people. the u.s. department of justice declines all the time. which brings us back to one doctor and one nurse who stand to make millions if the allegations of fraud prove true. the u.s. government will recover the bulk of whatever they win. they and others like them are the deputies in the fight against health care fraud. >> are you surprise thad you have to defend the u.s. tax pair and not the u.s. government knocking on this door? >> it is not easy to come forward and stand up and tell the truth but it is the right thing to do. >> their case set for trial later this year. >> drew, is theresy chance that the company settle the case and put the allegations behind them? >> you know the attorney for the company couldn't rule that out. but insists this time the company is going to fight the allegations. that is the bread and butter for the $7 billion business. more than 2/3 of the company's revenue comes from treating patients on medicare and medicaid. the company will make sure that it has that contra
jihad is a group that israel and the u.s. consider a terrorist organization. regular life here in gaza city is pretty much ground to a halt. stores are closed and shuttered, streets which would normally be full of people largely empty. most people try to stay indoors, only venturing out when they absolutely need to in order to buy supplies for their families. otherwise it's just too dangerous to go out. these days for israelis along the border and residents of gaza city, there is no such thing as regular life. as the battle enters its seventh day, casualties rage and grief grow on both sides of the border along with the fear that the worst may be yet to come. and i'm joined by wolf blitzer in jerusalem, also here with ben wedeman and arwa damon. yesterday you were at the scene of probably what was then the most controversial attack, on a strike what israeli forces said was owned by a hamas official, a commander of an artillery unit. they said initially he had been killed and they stepped back from that. a number of members of a family, at least nine members of a family, were killed. wh
of these people once again take cover in their homes? will the celebrations end and the fear return? for u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton and mohammed morsi who pushed for a cease fire, the agreement calls for discussion of a number of issues, including freedom of movement for palestinians in and out of gaza. and the agreement not to target the area in gaza, and to halt rocket fire into israel. again, a discussion, nothing is a done deal. over the next hour we'll look at the negotiations still happening now. we'll also hear from the spokeswoman for the israeli defense forces and from the leader of hamas. plus our reporters on the ground and a whole lot more. we begin with a look at what has transpired over just the last 24 hours. it is remarkable there was a cease-fire this hour, when you consider how this wednesday started off. take a look. add midday, no sign of a truce yet when a city bus is bombed in tel-aviv. at least two dozen were wounded. israeli police say terrorists left two bombs on the bus and fled. only one exploded. hamas praised the attack near the headquarters of the i
to testify in the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya, that certainly has a lot of people asking a lot of questions, understandably. the other angle to the story is an age-old tale of an affair between a married, powerful, highly respected man in washington and a younger woman. in this case, the woman who literally wrote the book on the general, paula broadwell. the two met when she was a graduate student at harvard. she later travelled to afghanistan, interviewed petraeus, sometimes going running with him. interviews that led to the book "all in the education of general david petraeus." the revelation about the affair is bringing new interest in all the interviews broadwell did to promote the book and what she said about petraeus at that time. take a look. >> he at the end of the day is a human, and is challenged by the burdens of command and has mastered wearing the mask of command, if you will. so he has this mask of command, you think he's really confident, but i got to see a more personal side. i'm not in love with david petraeus. >> he is quite a physical specimen. he reall
. we'll stay in close touch. thank you. >>> there is also word tonight that the u.s. government is actively considering bolder interventions in syria, including directly arming some of the opposition forces. short time ago i talked about that with the former cia officer, bob baer and cnn national security contributor, fran townsend. the u.s. ambassador to syria, robert ford, confirmed that the obama administration is considering deeper intervention to help the rebels in syria, something that to date, it's been loathe to do. no decision has been made at least not yet, we're told. what do you make of this? it would certainly be a dramatic policy shift. >> it would, wolf, but in some ways, it's too late. it's awfully, there are real consequences to the fact we waited and acted through allies. this has been a real crisis along the turkish border. we worked with our arab allies in saudi arabia and qatar but meanwhile, the vacuum that's been created while the assad regime annihilates its own people, the bloodshed that's taken place, has created this vacuum. the lack of western action,
is not aligned with prime minister netanyahu's coalition, seems to be beyond control, end quote. the u.s. state department is calling it a very dangerous situation. president obama talked to the leaders of israel and egypt and we are told secretary of state clinton has been working the phones trying to muster international pressure to diffuse the situation rockets have been flying both ways. israel is aiming at terrorist targets and that's what it looks and sounds like from a distance. here it is up close during an israeli and palestinian who are in the thick of it. >> let me jump in there, mohammed. when you hear him describe the situation where he is, what goes through your mind? >> sorry. that is one thing. carry on with your question. [ indiscernible ] >> the palestinian health minister says at least 30 people have been killed in gaza, 300 wounded. many of them children and women. he says we can't independently verify those numbers. cnn's sarah sidener is reporting for us in dangerous conditions. >> we have to leave this area now because there are air strikes, and we can hear the planes and
, will the celebrations ends and the fear return? for u.s. secretary of state hilary clinton and president morsi, the hope is that the deal will stick. it calls for freedom of movement for palestinians in and out of gaza and a commitment not to target militants and commitment from militant groups in gaza, to halt rocket fire into israel. again, a discussion nothing is a done deal. over the next hour, we'll look at negotiations still happening now, we'll also hear from the spokeswoman for the israeli defense forces and the leader much hamas. plus, a reporter on the ground and whole lot more. we begin with a look at what has transpired over the last 24 hours, and it's remarkable there is a cease-fire at this hour when you consider how this wednesday started off. take a look. at mid day, no sign of a truce when a city bus is bombed in tell aviv, two dozen people twounded. terrorists left two bombs on the bus and fled. only one exploded. hamas praised attack, near the headquarters of the israeli defense forces. farther south, an israeli home hit by a rocket. room after room, left in ruins. according to the is
going to a safe room. tel aviv, a residential building is also hit. u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton arrived for peace talks. >> the goal must be a durable outcome that promotes regional stability and advances the security and legitimate aspirations of israelis and palestinians alike. >> and that is what the last 24 hours have looked like, again, breaking news this evening, a series of massive explosions have really rocked central gaza city over the last hour or two. and we -- it is often the time when some of the biggest explosions occur. we are watching with some trepidation to see what may occur over the next hour. we'll join wolf blitzer, my colleague in jerusalem. arwa damon, and ben wedeman, and we have someone from sanford university, joining us from new york and princeton university's anne marie slaughter and we'll talk to the israeli ambassador of the united states. wolf, what are you hearing about hillary clinton's activity. she landed with tel aviv and met with benjamin netanyahu, and later she will meet with mahmoud abbas and president morsi in israel. what are yo
in. they've been married 35 years, have two grown kids. so how will this revelation exact the u.s. intelligence community? joining me now is fran townsend and bob baer and suzanne kelly. suzanne, what more can you tell us about the probe into the relationship with paula broadwell? do we know how long this has been going on? >> we don't know how long it was going on, but just the -- so they're the ones that would look into accusations of inappropriate access to classified information. individuals that hold clearances, are they doing what they need to be doing to make sure that information stays safe? is there any opportunity whatsoever that that information could be exploited by either a spy or anyone else who shouldn't have access to that information. so the fact that they were the ones looking into this, tells you that, you know, they were concerned about some of the e-mail things. let's back up for a moment. this was a tip that they were given. that there was this relationship going on between the two. what they have dug into were things like e-mails, texts, things like that. an
once again take cover in their homes and will the fear return? for u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton and mohamed moresy, the agreement calls for a discussion for the freedom of movement. commitment by israel not to target militants in gaza. to halt rocket fire into israel. nothing is a done deal. in the next hour we will hear from the spokeswoman for the israeli defense forces and we begin with a look at what has transpired over the last 24 hours. and it is remarkable that there is a cease fire when you consider how this wednesday started off. at midday no sign of atruce yet. at least two dozen people wounded. hamas praised the attack near the headquarters of the defense forces. farther south, a home was hit by a rocket. room after room left in ruins. more than 60 rockets were fired from gaza today. the others were intercepted. across the border in fagaza several large explosioned. the skyline of the city covered in smoke. the city on edge. on some streets buildings were turned to rubble. >> there used to be a small well-known shop here that has branchs throughout the city se
. farther north outside tel aviv, a residential building was also hit. just hours ago in jerusalem, u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton arrived for peace talks. >> the goal must be a durable outcome that promotes regional stability and advances the security and legitimate aspirations of israelis and palestinians alike. >> that is what the last 24 hours have looked like. again, the breaking news this evening, a series of massive explosions have really rocked central gaza city over the last hour or two, and it is often the time when some of the biggest explosions occur so we are watching with some trepidation to see what may occur over the next hour. we will talk to wolf blitzer, my colleague from cnn, in jerusalem. also here with me is arwa damon, ben wedeman, also fuad ajami joining us from new york. later on we will be joined by princeton university's ann marie slaughter as well as talking to the israeli ambassador to the united states. wolf, bring us up to speed on what you're hearing about hillary clinton's activities. she landed in tel aviv, met with prime minister benjamin neta
straight about what happened september 11th at the u.s. consulate compound in libya. ambassador christopher stevens as you know and three other americans were killed in that attack. cnn pentagon correspondent barbara starr has been talking to her sources to find out what the former cia director will say tomorrow. she joins me now. barbara, you have new information on what members can expect to hear tomorrow from petraeus as he talks to members about the attacks. what do you know? >> reporter: well, good evening, anderson. that's right, i've spoken to a source who is directly familiar with petraeus' thinking, what he's planning to try and say on capitol hill tomorrow. he wants to testify, he wants to clear up any, what he believes are misrepresentations of what he has said in the past and what he thinks really happened in benghazi. first up, this source says that petraeus will acknowledge that he knew quite quickly immediately afterwards that it was sharia, that libya al qaeda sympathizer group, that was responsible for it. but they had some conflicting information. he also had some 20 repor
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 93 (some duplicates have been removed)

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